Categories
Investing

Market Valuation Charts: 5/4/09

Bonds v Equities

Chart: Bond Yield over Equity Yield. 10-year treasury yield minus inverse of Graham P/E Ratio (10-year average equity earnings yield).
Current value: -2.8% (5/4/2009)
Low value: -4.9% (3/9/2009)

10-Year Return

Chart: Trailing 10-year return.
Current value: -3.8% (5/4/2009)
Low value: -5.9% (3/9/2009)

P/E Ratio 1881
P/E Ratio 1980

Chart: 10-year trailing Graham (“Real”) P/E Ratio. Price of the S&P 500 divided by the 10-year average of earnings, inflation adjusted.

Current value: 16.1x (5/4/2009)
Low value: 11.9x (3/9/2009)

One conclusion from the above charts is that based on the 128-year average, the market (as represented by the S&P 500) is fairly valued. (Data from S&P, Robert Shiller, and the St. Louis Fed.)

See also: Market Valuation Charts: 10/08

Categories
General Innovation

1908 – 2008 – 2108

MrMorgan
The New York Times, 11/4/1907

In October of 1907, financial markets in the United States came to a complete halt. Credit markets froze, major banks collapsed, and the stock market plunged. Heads of industry, like J. P. Morgan, were forced to inject massive amounts of capital to prevent a complete collapse.

The circumstances of the Panic of 1907 are very similar to our current crisis. In both, the economy had experienced huge growth over the preceding decade. Banks lowered lending standards, which led people to take on more and more debt. When bank assets began to decline, depositors panicked, and there was a run on the financial system.

But for the rest of this post, I’d like to focus on the period that follows a financial crisis—not on the crisis itself. (Keep in mind that although I speak in terms of American progress, my point applies to any country around the world.)

* * *

The period following 1907 was monumental in American history.

Categories
Investing

Market Valuation Charts: 10/08

PE Ratio
Chart: 10-year trailing Graham (“Real”) P/E Ratio. Price of the S&P 500 divided by the 10-year average of earnings, inflation adjusted.
Current value (10/31/08): 15.9x

Profit Margin
Chart: Profit Margin of U.S. Economy. Annualized corporate profits as a percentage of GDP. (A good reason why the Graham P/E Ratio is a better valuation measure than the TTM version.)
Current value (6/30/08): 9.40%

Bonds v Equities
Chart: Bond Yield over Equity Yield. 10-year treasury yield minus inverse of Graham P/E Ratio (10-year average equity earnings yield).
Current value (10/31/08): -2.4% (equities yield 2.4% more than bonds)